SCI-KU – can you?

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SCI-KU & Science Poetry Competition

Here’s something to cross-fertilize disciplines and explore the filmy line between science and art/literature!

More About Haiku & SCI-KU

Submit your own Sci-ku poems with a statistics or maths theme.

  •  primary,
  • secondary
  • open category

For National Science Week annual celebration of science

How to Enter – On-line entry & Rules

This competition is an initiative of RiAus

OR

  •  a new prize for Science Poetry – for over 18 years – explores scientific understandings and achievements. Science includes the natural and physical sciences, the applied sciences, the newly emerging and interdisciplinary fields and mathematics.

Saturday August 10 to Sunday August 18

Great Big Science Read Book Recommendations

Science Daily

Discover Science

Harmony Day Stories, Awards & Opportunities

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 ‘Many Stories – One Australia’

Harmony Day 2013

Register events, resources for school , Harmony Day Apps

RED Cross initiatives

Y Challenge – Celebrating Diversity

  • Y Challenge supports  young people between 8 and 17 years
  • based in teamwork
  • driven by young people
  • delivering what a community wants.
  •  depends on the Y Challenge team and the community it interacts with.
  • Samples of last years winners

SBS Initiative

Day and this year’s theme: Many stories—One Australia, SBS are giving
all Australians the opportunity to share their story.

Create a video, take a photo or share your written personal journey. Everyone
has a story to tell, so share yours today!

  • There are two
    fantastic prize packs up for grabs:
  • First prize: A Canon EOS 110D SLR Camera Twin Lens Kit
    complete with memory card, tripod and case plus SBS’ A Day in the Life
    photographic book.
  • Second prize: An Apple iPad 4 with Retina Display 32GB WiFi
    + Cellular plus SBS’ A Day in the Life photographic book.

For more information,
visit www.sbs.com.au/harmonystories

Art, Audio and Writing from the Junior School

Story, pastel artwork and audio by Nicole

Nicole : reads her story

‘…the black creatures were under the boat.’

James and His dad were out fishing at Pirates cove when James suddenly asked his dad the strangest question, “Hey Dad, why do Killer Whales have white spots?”  “Well,” said James’s dad, “it starts off right here in Cape town at Pirates Cove.  A long, long time ago all the pirates would have a yearly meeting in one of the caves near Table Mountain. They would sail their ships down the coast line and into the bay.”

“Then late one stormy summer’s night the waves were high and the wind was strong. The ships were coming into dock and there were black figures darting under the pirate ships.” “Were they the Killer Whales,” asked James who was suddenly filled with excitement. “Yes, they were.”

“So, where were we up to? Oh yes, now I remember, I was up to the part where the boats were coming in and the black creatures were going under the boat.  They circled the ships playfully as they went on their way.”

At the lighthouse the oldest of all the pirates that lived around Cape Town was having a bit of trouble because the candle wouldn’t light with all the wetness.  He tried and tried but try as he could it would not light.

The waves were getting bigger……………….” “Daaad! Get on with the point now.” “Listen James I am just telling the story as it was. So back to the story then. The waves were getting bigger and the Pirates were getting agitated. Why wasn’t the light working? Should they continue or should they anchor till dawn?”

“Then……James! Are you even listening?” “Yes Dad.” “Okay then back to the story. A giant wave came and took the biggest ship crashing into the rocks. Now, I know you are thinking to yourself ‘What has that got to do with everything’ but you see James this boat had nearly a ton of Condensed milk on it.”

 “The Condensed milk fell overboard and into the ocean. It spilt all over those slimy black creatures and it never came off. And that is how the Orca got its white spots James!”

That James, is how the Orca got his white spots.

UNICEF Universal Children’s Day – Supported by Morris Gleitzman

Each year, schools around Australia celebrate UNICEF Day for Children to help make a difference to the lives of children who still miss out on their right to go to school. UNICEF Australia’s Children’s Ambassador, Morris Gleitzman, is encouraging kids across Australia to come to school dressed in blue on Universal Children’s Day (24th October 2012) to help support the work of UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund.

Find out more

Worlds Next Door & Epilogue

Mrs Wessely has donated copies of her edited works to the Learning Hub – short stories by various authors in speculative fiction.

Worlds Next Door : Containing 25 bite-sized stories by Australian authors including Paul Collins, Michael Pryor, Pamela Freeman, Dirk Flinthart, Tansy Rayner Roberts and Jenny Blackford, Worlds Next Door is perfect for the budding reader : from Goodreads Review.

Epilogue : The apocalypse – is it the end of the world or hope for the future?

Reviewer and author Guy Salvidge writes ‘Many of the stories herein have an optimistic bent to uplift us from the all-too-dystopian world we live in.’ Read his review.

Read all about it at the Learning Hub. Thanks Mrs, Wessely, we are looking forward to the good reads.

Garth Nix Visit to Launceston

Count the places you can visit Garth Nix!

And then visit him in the flesh…4PM

At Fullers Bookshop Launceston.

Tuesday 24th July.

Garth Nix on FB

‘Erratically maintained’ web page.

The Keys to the Kingdom

Troubletwisters

The Old Kingdom Chronicles 

The Nine Steps to a Novel by Garth Nix 

You will have the opportunity to hear him speak  about the release of his new novel A Confusion of Princes.

Ray Bradbury – sci-fi hybrid “In science fiction, we dream”

Ray Bradbury, the American author who helped popularise science fiction with works such as The Martian Chronicles, has died at the age of 91.

Watch & Read About his life, work & philosophy. A revered and elder literary statesman.

Ray Bradbury Official Web Page

  • Fahrenheit 451, a classic novel about book censorship in a future society

  • The Illustrated Man

  • Something Wicked This Way Comes

Millions of Bradbury’s books have been sold around the world and his stories translated into dozens of languages.

A child of the Depression born in small-town Illinois, he grew up reading Jules Verne, HG Wells, Edgar Allan Poe and George Bernard Shaw.

Over his long career there were hundreds of novels, plays, scripts and poetry.

He called himself a ‘hybrid’ author, ranging across fantasy, horror and science fiction.

VALE Ray Bradbury

Non-fiction needs new nomenclature

It’s such a negative connotation, ‘non’, even in the context of reading when it excludes ‘fiction’. Boundaries get crossed. There’s ‘faction’ – fiction woven into ‘real’ historical facts and non-fiction written in ‘literary’ styles.

We need new words!

Reading non-fiction is an opportunity to pursue your interests, relish wonderful writing and take you to places you haven’t yet imagined. Like all writing – like history – it is written through the experience and background of the author. The Rory Gilmore Book Club discussion page at goodreads is a place to start.

How many times have you finished a fiction book that swept you away and THEN you want to know all about the author. That’s what happens to me.  This weekend I knocked over M.J. Hyland’s How the Light Gets In, and got swept up in discovering everything about M.J. Hyalnd, and everything else that she has written. So, reading non-fiction is something about wanting – like all reading – to roll about in the luscious words, to find out, and to be taken somewhere else.

Visit Word Worlds Non-fiction, and watch it grow.